Swedish Egg Coffee


Everything is better with fresh eggs, we all know that. But what about coffee? Yup, even coffee. If you have never tried Swedish Egg Coffee (also called Norwegian Egg Coffee or Lutheran Church Egg Coffee), you don't know what you're missing!


Being Scandinavian myself, I had been meaning to try Swedish Egg Coffee for some time. Popular in Sweden and Norway before the turn of the last century, egg coffee migrated to this country with the Scandinavian immigrants and is now a staple at Lutheran Church socials and functions in the American Midwest. It literally involves crushing a whole egg, shell and all, into coffee grounds and then brewing your coffee.

According to what I've read, the egg clarifies the coffee grounds and separates them from the brewed coffee (no filter is used), while the shell pulls the bitterness and acidity out of the coffee grounds, resulting in a cup of extremely smooth, mellow coffee. In addition, the lack of filter allows the coffee essential oils to remain in the pot of brewed coffee which makes for a very rich coffee. The entire process intrigued me and I finally decided that this morning was the morning to give Egg Coffee at try. So I read a few recipes online, realized they are all pretty much the same, and got started.

Swedish Egg Coffee
(makes 4-6 servings)

6 Cups water
3/4 Cup ground coffee
1 Fresh egg
1/4 Cup ice water (or 3 ice cubes)

Bring the water to a rolling boil in a stove top coffee pot or saucepan.  Meanwhile, with a fork stir the egg into the coffee grounds, crushing the shell in as well. The mixture should look like moist potting soil.  Add the egg mixture to the water and boil for a minute or two and then cover and remove from the heat. Let stand five minutes, then pour in the ice water (or add the ice cubes) and let stand for another minute or so to allow the grounds to sink to the bottom. Strain through a strainer or just ladle the coffee off the top into coffee cups. Makes 6 servings.

**Don't forget the eggy grounds make a wonderful addition to your compost pile or garden.


-Stir coffee grounds and egg together, crush the shell in too-

-Boil, remove from heat, add ice cubes, let sit and then ladle out your freshly brewed coffee-

-I love this coffee so much, I actually bought myself a small stove top coffee pot to use-
If I tell you this coffee was nothing short of amazing, I would not be exaggerating. It's so easy too. I am sold on this method, and I'm thinking our Mr. Coffee might just end up in the pile to be donated to charity.  So, are you brave enough to try making some Swedish Egg Coffee? Have you ever tried it?



GOD MORGON!

BECAUSE LIFE IS JUST BETTER WITH CHICKENS!


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13 comments:

  1. Okay. This recipe sounds BEYOND STRANGE. But I believe you, Lisa. I'm going to try it. I swear I am…. ... just have to muster the courage….

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    1. Oh trust me, I have been thinking about doing this for ages....but yeah, it IS beyond strange, but just like most of the stuff our grandparents did, it's awesome and makes so much sense! All you have to lose is 3/4 cup of ground coffee and an egg right? I even have convinced my husband to try a cup on Saturday morning!

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  2. Sounds a bit frightening :-) but it would be wrong to judge it before l've tried it. Fun trying old methods, keeping them alive. Pam in Norway

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  3. Hahha! Yes, I so agree with you there! I was a bit afraid to try it but it truly brews a nice cup of coffee! So I guess in your part of Norway this isn't common then?

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  4. My mother (Lutheran/German) has talked about this but I have never tried it. She used to do it with her perk-o-lator coffee maker. I'm going to have to try it. Now how do I get the girls to lay me an egg in the winter? Can I use a duck egg?

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    1. That's funny you should ask! I just used one this morning because I had no chicken eggs. It did work.

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  5. Funny, I'm a lifelong German Lutheran, and I had never heard of this in my family. However, this is the way they brew coffee in the Betsy-Tacy books by Maud Hart Lovelace, and those take place in the early 1900s in Minnesota...so I'm guessing they were Scandinavian Lutheran? ;) Anyway, ever since reading those books, I've wanted to try this method. I don't have access to pastured eggs yet, though... :(

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    1. Any egg should work, as the egg & coffee boils together, the temperature will kill any bacteria.

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  6. I have heard of using eggshells to enhance coffee and even read about it in a cozy mystery, but not the whole egg.

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  7. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  8. I married into a midwestern Swedish Lutheran family, and the first time I had heard about egg coffee was from my future grandmothers-in-law. I had forgotten all about it. My DH always said it was good, but now that you've endorsed it, Lisa, I'm going to try it. :) Thank you so much for the recipe, as I was picturing a MUCH different method that likely would've ended up in disaster!

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  9. Ok strange questions, doesn't it cook the egg? Or, is that what you want?

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  10. I am absolutely going to do this. I do have a question first though; What is the purpose of the ice cubes?

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