Grow Herbs Indoors this Winter - My Top Choices

Fresh herbs play an important role in both my home cooking and chicken keeping, so I plant a large herb garden each spring - and harvest herbs by the handful as I need them all through the summer. I also dry any excess to use through the winter, but with temperatures hovering in the 40s at night lately, it's about time to bring some of the plants indoors so I have fresh herbs through the winter as well. 

You can start plants from seeds, take cuttings and root them in water, dig up a clump from your garden or buy plants at a garden center or nursery. Seeds and rooting obviously takes longer, and since the basil and others won't make it through the winter, my preferred method is to dig up a small clump of each herb from my existing garden.

Simply dig up a nice healthy-looking clump, pot it in a 6-inch container with some fresh potting mix or garden soil mixed with sand for good drainage, and place in a south-facing window. Choose a location that stays between 55 and 75 degrees, has good air circulation and plenty of sunlight. (Keep in mind that the area right next to a window may be too cold for some herbs in the dead of winter.)

If you do need to propagate some herbs from cuttings, just pick a nice healthy looking stem about 4-6-inches long and strip off the bottom set of leaves. Place the stem in water and then plant it in soil in a pot (as described above) once some nice roots develop.

-Planting seeds takes awhile, but it can be done and it's easy if you join The Seeds Of The Month Club-
-Propagating basil cuttings in water is quick and easy-
-Dig up small clumps, roots and all, right from the garden-
-Separate a small piece of a larger clump to plant indoors-
-Plant your herb in a small pot with good drainage and sandy soil-
-Set your pots (I love these from Pennsylvania Products Company) in a south-facing sunny window-
-Enjoy fresh herbs all winter long!-
Since most herbs originated in the Mediterranean, they love lots of dry, sandy soil and sunlight and can succumb to root rot if they are over-watered, so water only as needed. Pinch or snip your plants regularly to encourage bushy growth and to avoid the plants becoming 'leggy'. Be sure to leave at least 2/3 of the plant any time you prune and pluck off the stem right above the next set of leaves.

Over the years I’ve experimented with growing various herbs indoors during the winter. Some do fine with little attention, while others seem to need more TLC and light/heat. Some don't transplant well, others do.  So here are my top choices for easy herbs to grow indoors through the winter.


Enjoy your potted herbs all winter long and come spring you can plant them back in your garden or move the containers outside.

For information on the health benefits of various culinary herbs for you and your chickens, read HERE.

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