Building a Predator-Proof Chicken Run


When we moved to Maine last summer, we were lucky enough to have a beautiful coop from Horizon Structures  delivered soon after we moved in for our chickens and ducks. Because we live in the woods and have to worry about predators like foxes, coyotes, hawks, eagles, raccoon and fisher cats, we spent the next several weeks building them an attached run. I incorporated some neat features and lots of predator-proofing to keep our chickens safe and happy when we aren't outside with them and they can't be out free ranging.

A Week in Farm Photos - March 20th - 26th


This week we got a whole range of seasons, from spring, back to winter again, and then right back to spring. It snowed three times, once enough that we even had to shovel! And then by the next day most of the snow had melted and it was sunny and warm. I'm growing seedlings like crazy - I just couldn't wait any longer. If they get too big before it's warm enough to plant them outside, the chickens will help me eat them, I'm sure.  Enjoy this peek at our week!

Planting Herbs in DIY Vintage Inspired Tin Cans



I look forward to spring and starting seeds indoors in preparation for transplanting them outside in the garden. I especially like to start herb seeds, since the plants are generally small and can stay inside a bit longer than other crops if the weather doesn't cooperate with you.

A Week in Farm Photos - March 13th to 19th


And just when we think winter is over, BAM! it snows again and the temperatures drop down to near 20 degrees. I mulched all the iris shoots already starting to come up, hoping they would make it through the sudden cold snap okay, and I'm glad I have only started seedlings indoors so far. The snow didn't last long, it melted pretty much as soon as it hit the ground, but I keep forgetting...we're not in Virginia anymore, Toto!

All About Chicken Poop - Green, Brown, Black and Everything In Between


Normal chicken poop can range from all shades of brown, to green, yellow or even black. The range of "normal" varies by hen, diet, time of year and overall health - as well as what type of feces it is; broody, cecal or "everyday". By monitoring your chickens' output, you can often get an early indication that something is wrong, but be sure to know the range of normal so you don't overreact to sudden changes.

A Week in Farm Photos - March 6th to 12th


Serious spring fever going on around here! Although we did see snow earlier this week, the temperatures have been edging towards 50 degrees and I just had to get planting! So I started some seeds indoors, and I'm sending off soil samples next week so I can start thinking about getting our garden plots ready for planting.  

The nesting boxes are seeing lots of action lately and I'm about ready to pop some hatching eggs into the incubator.  It's about time for some new Littles around here. In fact, I ended this week over at Tractor Supply to help them kick off Chick Days. Fortunately, they were all out of chicks, so I didn't have to worry about succumbing to temptation. Enjoy this peek at our week and don't forget to turn your clocks ahead tonight!

Egg Size Chart - What's the Difference Between a Medium Egg and a Jumbo Egg



If you do any baking, I'm sure you've seen recipes that call for 'three medium eggs' or '2 large eggs'. But what does that mean? And how do your fresh eggs from your chickens measure up? Well, I'll tell you.

A Week in Farm Photos - February 28th to March 5th


This week brought a flurry of deadlines and also snow flurries to our little slice of heaven here in Maine. Spring is in the air though. I started some seeds on the windowsill, egg production has rebounded, and there's even a bit of green in the grass, buds on tree branches, and mud. Lots of mud. Enjoy this peek at our week!

7 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Choosing Chicks


In conjunction with Tractor Supply Company Chick Days, I'll be appearing at various stores during this spring's events, helping people pick out their chicks, teaching them how to raise them and answering any questions they have. Early education really is the key to a successful, healthy flock, so I'm really excited to be involved in this event as part of being an Ambassador for the company, and be able to get even more people started out raising their chickens naturally for the best start in life.


 photo subscribe-banner-700_zpsn8yjeogq.jpg